As the chariot maneuvers to the left side of the track, the other chariots swerve aside – a horrendous collision could’ve occurred had such measures not been taken. The smaller vehicles in this Roman race swerved in and out – a dangerous web of high-speed objects weaving between one another. The Italian music on the radio set the perfect mood for the stunning display of land-based aerobatics.

The vehicles involved in these aerobatics – a mixture of larger trucks (though still small by American standards), puny cars, and two-wheeled wonders, really do create quite the incredible show. What I love about the whole thing is the kindness of all cars involved. Though swerving in and out of traffic seems blatantly rude by American standards, in Europe (or at the very least in Rome), it’s perfectly acceptable. It seems that absolutely no one cares.

What’s weird is that I don’t find it to be the slightest bit obnoxious. Granted, I’m not the one driving, but, I’ve been thoroughly enjoying the ride through Rome. Everyone treats others and allows others to treat them as pigeons – if you move somewhere, others will move out of your way. Likewise, if someone is moving in, you let them. And the surprising thing is that despite all the crazy swerving, merging, and passing despite deadly odds, I haven’t seen one accident. Heck, I’d even go so far as to describe the roads of Rome to be living organisms in and of themselves. The fluid movement of the vehicles on the road seems to work for the benefit of everyone involved. And I love it.

I sincerely wish that the streets of America functioned in such a beautiful way. Though many, I’m sure, would be scared witless at the sight, I feel that it’s the best way to go.